The Ditchdigger's Daughters

by Yvonne S. Thornton
The Ditchdigger's Daughters

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£15.99
It was the 1950s, and Donald Thornton's words to his six daughters weren't spoken out of despair, but out of the fiercest love. Thornton, a hard-working labourer, had set his heart on an improbable notion: that all his girls would grow up to become doctors. From one of those daughters, Dr. Yvonne Thornton, comes this family biography that is as moving as it is inspiring. Here is the true story of a determined, wise, and prescient man who dared to dream that his Black daughters would achieve seemingly impossible goals in the face of seemingly impossible odds. Working two full-time jobs - and with the help of his equally remarkable wife, who worked as a cleaning woman - Thornton even formed his bright and talented girls into a rhythm-and-blues band, at the same time ensuring that each one completed her education. With his common sense and untutored but right-on insights, Thornton gave his daughters the strength to transcend the obstacles of colour and gender to fulfil their potential - ultimately guiding them from the tenements of East Harlem to the footlights of the Apollo Theatre - to the halls of an Ivy League medical school.
About the book

It was the 1950s, and Donald Thornton's words to his six daughters weren't spoken out of despair, but out of the fiercest love. Thornton, a hard-working labourer, had set his heart on an improbable notion: that all his girls would grow up to become doctors. From one of those daughters, Dr. Yvonne Thornton, comes this family biography that is as moving as it is inspiring. Here is the true story of a determined, wise, and prescient man who dared to dream that his Black daughters would achieve seemingly impossible goals in the face of seemingly impossible odds. Working two full-time jobs - and with the help of his equally remarkable wife, who worked as a cleaning woman - Thornton even formed his bright and talented girls into a rhythm-and-blues band, at the same time ensuring that each one completed her education. With his common sense and untutored but right-on insights, Thornton gave his daughters the strength to transcend the obstacles of colour and gender to fulfil their potential - ultimately guiding them from the tenements of East Harlem to the footlights of the Apollo Theatre - to the halls of an Ivy League medical school.