Sasinda Futhi Siselapha (still Here)

by Derilene 'Dee' Marco
Sasinda Futhi Siselapha (still Here)
  • ISBN-13: 9781569026502
  • Author(s): Derilene 'Dee' Marco
  • Subject: African studies
  • Publisher: Africa World Press
  • Imprint: Africa World Press
  • Publication Date: 30-12-2020
  • Format: p/b

Availability: In stock

£25.99
Sasinda and Siselapha (Still Here) is a fearless new interdisciplinary collection of contemporary criticism in the arts and humanities by scholars working on contemporary South Africa. Authors examine the period after the legal end of apartheid across genre and with an eye toward the study of culture. Derilene (Dee) Marco studies the cinematic legacies of Coetzee's Disgrace; Sharlene Khan explores the hateful art criticism that has become the norm in response to Black and women of color artists; Natalia Molebatsi theorises about the poetry scene and its aesthetics and ethics of healing across generations; Zethu Cakata examines the injuries caused by unenforced post 1994 language policies; Ashraf Jamal analyses how 'African' is African art and Bhavisha Panchia offers a provocative argument for the use of laughter, humour and play as anticolonial political ethical strategies; Peter Hudson scrutinises the colonial unconscious reproducing itself through capitalist property relations in th
About the book

Sasinda and Siselapha (Still Here) is a fearless new interdisciplinary collection of contemporary criticism in the arts and humanities by scholars working on contemporary South Africa. Authors examine the period after the legal end of apartheid across genre and with an eye toward the study of culture. Derilene (Dee) Marco studies the cinematic legacies of Coetzee's Disgrace; Sharlene Khan explores the hateful art criticism that has become the norm in response to Black and women of color artists; Natalia Molebatsi theorises about the poetry scene and its aesthetics and ethics of healing across generations; Zethu Cakata examines the injuries caused by unenforced post 1994 language policies; Ashraf Jamal analyses how 'African' is African art and Bhavisha Panchia offers a provocative argument for the use of laughter, humour and play as anticolonial political ethical strategies; Peter Hudson scrutinises the colonial unconscious reproducing itself through capitalist property relations in th