Why Psychosis Is Not So Crazy

by Stijn Vanheule

Why Psychosis Is Not So Crazy

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£16.99
Are we all a little crazy? Roughly 15 percent of the population will have a psychotic experience, in which they lose contact with reality. And yet we still often struggle to understand and talk about psychosis. Interactions between people build on the stories they tell each other - stories about the past, about who they are or what they want. In psychosis we can no longer rely on these stories, this shared language. So how should we communicate with someone experiencing reality in a radically different way than we are? Drawing on his work in psychoanalysis, Stijn Vanheule seeks to answer this question, which carries significant implications for mental health as a whole. With a combination of theory from Freud to Lacan, present-day research, and compelling examples from his own patients and well-known figures such as director David Lynch and artist Yayoi Kusama, he explores psychosis in an engaging way that can benefit those suffering from it as well as the people who care for and interact with them.
About the book

Are we all a little crazy? Roughly 15 percent of the population will have a psychotic experience, in which they lose contact with reality. And yet we still often struggle to understand and talk about psychosis. Interactions between people build on the stories they tell each other - stories about the past, about who they are or what they want. In psychosis we can no longer rely on these stories, this shared language. So how should we communicate with someone experiencing reality in a radically different way than we are? Drawing on his work in psychoanalysis, Stijn Vanheule seeks to answer this question, which carries significant implications for mental health as a whole. With a combination of theory from Freud to Lacan, present-day research, and compelling examples from his own patients and well-known figures such as director David Lynch and artist Yayoi Kusama, he explores psychosis in an engaging way that can benefit those suffering from it as well as the people who care for and interact with them.