To Be or Not to Be Developed

by Reidulf Molvaer
To Be or Not to Be Developed

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£29.95
Modern development had its hesitant beginnings less than 300 years ago, and historians still debate the forces behind this ongoing event. It clearly is related to the organization of human efforts and the use of natural sources, but arrangements in relation to trade and access to resources are equally significant. There is no society or country that does not want to take part in what we call economic development, but without degrading people to becoming just producing automata. Still we occasionally divide the word into the developed and the less developed (or even underdeveloped) parts of the world. It is not easy to point exactly to causes for the rapid development of some countries and why others linger behind. Many theories have been put forward to explain development and the lack of it. In this book, an attempt has been made to point to some of the factors that may have had a decisive influence on development and what has hindered such development. Both historical factors and social organization and individual efforts and preconditions are discussed, and possible paths to improved use of human and natural resources are debated. Politics cannot be overlooked in this connection, but it is also clear that many or most poor countries with destitute populations can make progress and improve the lot of their people. The author hopes to challenge people especially in developing countries to intensify their efforts to help people on the way to a better material and social life.
About the book

Modern development had its hesitant beginnings less than 300 years ago, and historians still debate the forces behind this ongoing event. It clearly is related to the organization of human efforts and the use of natural sources, but arrangements in relation to trade and access to resources are equally significant. There is no society or country that does not want to take part in what we call economic development, but without degrading people to becoming just producing automata. Still we occasionally divide the word into the developed and the less developed (or even underdeveloped) parts of the world. It is not easy to point exactly to causes for the rapid development of some countries and why others linger behind. Many theories have been put forward to explain development and the lack of it. In this book, an attempt has been made to point to some of the factors that may have had a decisive influence on development and what has hindered such development. Both historical factors and social organization and individual efforts and preconditions are discussed, and possible paths to improved use of human and natural resources are debated. Politics cannot be overlooked in this connection, but it is also clear that many or most poor countries with destitute populations can make progress and improve the lot of their people. The author hopes to challenge people especially in developing countries to intensify their efforts to help people on the way to a better material and social life.