The Fairy Godmother's Growth Guide

by Marisa McGrady
The Fairy Godmother's Growth Guide

Availability: In stock

£16.99
Modern media makes self-love seem simple. Buy a bath bomb, apply a face mask, and voila! You've got self-love, commodified and canned for your convenience. But self-love cannot be bought. There is no 'one-size-fits-all' approach to self-care. What happens once our bubble baths drain and feelings of self-loathing, doubt, or despair creep back in? How do our bodies, resource availability (including free time), and physical and emotional needs impact our ability to care for ourselves? Are our bodies 'bad' just because certain industries, organizations, or people deem them so? Are we 'bad' people if we experience negativity, or struggle with self-love and self-care? Social media sensation Marisa McGrady, also known as @ris.writes or the Fairy Godmother online, explores these questions and more in her debut self-help book, The Fairy Godmother's Growth Guide: Whimsical Poems and Radical Prose for Self-Exploration. The bite-sized poems in Part I propose new perspectives about our bodies and
About the book

Modern media makes self-love seem simple. Buy a bath bomb, apply a face mask, and voila! You've got self-love, commodified and canned for your convenience. But self-love cannot be bought. There is no 'one-size-fits-all' approach to self-care. What happens once our bubble baths drain and feelings of self-loathing, doubt, or despair creep back in? How do our bodies, resource availability (including free time), and physical and emotional needs impact our ability to care for ourselves? Are our bodies 'bad' just because certain industries, organizations, or people deem them so? Are we 'bad' people if we experience negativity, or struggle with self-love and self-care? Social media sensation Marisa McGrady, also known as @ris.writes or the Fairy Godmother online, explores these questions and more in her debut self-help book, The Fairy Godmother's Growth Guide: Whimsical Poems and Radical Prose for Self-Exploration. The bite-sized poems in Part I propose new perspectives about our bodies and